EBSA20 Preconference courses 2017

Day 1 – 25 April

 

 

 Day 2 – 26 April

A.M.

P.M.

A – Auditing: a comprehensive and practical introduction

B –Design and implementation of the biorisk management system

C – Critical engineering in BSL3 facilities

D – Commissioning and validation of containment laboratories − Why? What needs to be verified and how to proceed?

E – Biological waste management

F – Autoclaving as a safe and consistent process: Waste autoclaves - selection, validation and performance

G – Safe and reliable Effluent Decontamination Systems : An EDS is more than “a Kill Tank”

H – Role of the biosafety professional with respect to occupational health when working with experimental animals, including Zebra fish and other aquatic species I – Handling materials with unknown risks J – Risks of working with neural tissues from conformational neurodegenerative disorders: The prion paradigms
K – GMP tools and tips on “large scale” manufacturing and GMP – what do the biosafety professional need to know about GMP; tools and tips for the biosafety professional to teach the GMP people about biosafety L - Tools and tips for practical Biosafety Training
M – Applied biosafety risk assessment in the daily work of a biosafety professional N – Latest methodologies in gene technology
New risks? New uncertainties? New ris assessment?
O - Biosecurity  

 

 

 

Course

Topic

Length

Dates

A

Auditing: a comprehensive and practical introduction

Instructors: Helmut Bachmayer and Gary Burns

Limited to 15 participants only - book early!

Short description of course

This two day practical course provides a comprehensive and sound practical introduction to auditing. The course takes participants through the principles, recognized best practices and essential techniques of (HSE / biosafety) auditing. It provides them with guidance on planning and performing of an audit in line with international standards.

The course will be of interest to those with no or limited auditing experience and / or formal training. It will set out the principles of effective (bio)safety, health and environmental auditing and compare and contrast this with inspection approaches. The trainers will explain how to prepare, structure and conduct an audit by sharing with the participants their extensive auditing experience in the areas of HSE / biosafety.  They will point out potential pitfalls as well as good practices including communication and interviewing skills, and drafting of audit reports. The course will be highly interactive and practical with focus on syndicate work in break-out sessions and exercises including simulation of audit opening and closing sessions, interviewing as part of desk-top reviews and facility walk-throughs, and drafting of an audit report.

At the end of the two day training course delegates will understand the elements of an audit system and program, they will know the essential tools and realize behavioral implications. The course should enable delegates to plan and carry out audits of small facilities within the context of their own work experience, and to contribute to the planning of as well as participate as a team member in HSE / biosafety audits of a more complex nature lead by an experienced auditor.

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference:

The topic refers to competence 7.2.22 and training specification C.2.1.2.18 Audits and inspections

2 days

25 -26 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00 both days

B

Design and implementation of the biorisk management system

Instructors: Juergen Mertsching and Urs Pauli

Short description of course:

Recent breaches of biosafety and biosecurity have emphasised that management failure is normally the root cause of accidents and incidents with biological agents and toxins. Implementation of a systematic biorisk management system, e.g. adopting the CWA 15793 can help organisations manage these risks. The CWA 15793:2011 "Laboratory Biorisk Management” is an internationally recognized management document to specifically address hazards associated with laboratories where biological materials are handled at all containment levels. With respect to individual state legislation, CWA 15793 is a compendium of all biosafety issues irrespective of actual laws or administrative provisions. It defines key requirements encompassing all relevant laws and does not focus on the application of individual pieces of legislation and by thus does not contradict any existing guidelines. The importance of CWA 15793:2011 becomes evident by the fact that the process of further development into an ISO document has been started recently.

The 2-days-course will start with the introduction of the principles of a biorisk management and how the multiple components of a biorisk programme can be integrated into the management system(s) in place or to be developed in an institution. Participants will be asked to give a short presentation of their institution at the beginning and to summarize their experience with a biorisk management approach. The main emphasis of the two days will be the opportunity for the participants to work on a scheme for implementation or improvement of a biorisk management for their respective home institutes.

The course participants will be able to:

  • Identify the fundamentals of a biorisk management system
  • Understand the intent of the CWA 15793:2011 with emphasis on:
    • Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle
    • Policies
    • Risk management
    • Operational control
    • Emergency response and accident and incident investigation
    • Training, awareness and competence
  • Initiate or improve the implementation of the CWA 15793:2011 for their institution.

To optimize the individual benefit, the course instructors will contact the participants in advance to recommend which information of their home institutions the participants should bring along (if available).

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to competence 7.2.17 and training specifications C.2.1.2.15 Biorisk management programme

2 days

25 -26 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00 both days

C

Critical engineering in BSL3 facilities

Instructors: Mark Wheatley and Philippe Stroot

Short description of the course:

BSL3 facilities are technically complex facilities, and generally a major and quite unique investment for most institutions. It is therefore important that they operate effectively and efficiently according to the needs of the organisation. This workshop aims at exploring a number of specific engineering aspects that are likely, if not taken into consideration and treated appropriately, to pose problems during the commissioning phase or later during the operation of BSL3 facilities.

This workshop is an advanced level course designed for biosafety professionals who have already completed training on facility design and construction and on BSL3 activities, or have equivalent experience, in line with CWA 16335 on biosafety professional competence.

The trainers plan to use a blend of presentations, discussions and group working, in order to make the participants more able to:

  • consider and discuss usual requirements and practices, rationale and main available options
  • identify principles and main possible issues
  • understand design and engineering approaches
  • discuss and evaluate common errors and specifics to consider.

Main topics:

  • HVAC design (including air distribution, pressure management and filtration)
  • Airtightness, sealability and airborne room decontamination
  • Waste decontamination systems (autoclaves and effluent decontamination systems)
  • Controls, monitoring, display and alarms
  • Common problems, troubleshooting, remediation (using case studies)
     

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to some sections of competence 7.2.9 and training specifications C.2.1.2.7 Facility design, construction, commissioning, decommissioning, validation, operation and maintenance

1 day

25 April 2017

9:00 - 17:00

D

Commissioning and validation of containment laboratories − Why? What needs to be verified and how to proceed?

Instructors: Philippe Stroot and Felix Gmünder

Short description of the course:

Commissioning and validation are terms that are used in various settings and circumstances. What do they exactly mean in the context of the design, construction, and startup of a biological facility, such as a containment laboratory? Why are they needed and what is their purpose? And what needs to be verified accordingly?

This workshop intends to answer these questions and many others, in order to allow biosafety professionals to understand commissioning and validation, and become able to fulfil their role efficiently and effectively during the design, construction and early operation phases of a containment facility such as a BSL3 laboratory. So, the course is designed for biosafety professionals with some knowledge and experience in design, construction, and management of containment facilities. Facility managers and vendors of services and equipment involved in the verification process are also welcome.

After an introduction to the current concepts, participants will be actively involved in discussing and developing possible approaches and solutions. They will work on the development of a verification plan, mostly from the perspective of what needs to be checked from a biorisk management perspective, and when and how it can be done. More to the point, participants will work by way of examples on the development of commissioning and validation plans and criteria for selected features, processes and equipment items such as room air tightness, room decontamination, or an autoclave. For the whole duration of the course, participants are welcome to ask questions and share experiences.

Main topics:

  • Needs and rationale of verification (commissioning and validation) in the context of the design and construction of biological facilities
  • Roles of the biosafety professional in the verification process
  • Current terminology and approaches used in different settings
  • Development and implementation of a verification plan
  • Development of example commissioning and validation plans and criteria for selected features (e.g., air tightness), processes (e.g., room decontamination), or equipment (e.g., an autoclave)
  •  

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to some sections of competence 7.2. and training specifications C.2.1.2.7 Facility design, construction, commissioning, decommissioning, validation, operation and maintenance

1 day

26 April 2017

9:00 - 17:00

E

Biological waste management

Instructors: Toon De Kesel and Joerg Schibel

Short description of the course:

Biological waste originates from human or animal health care, medical and biotech research, laboratories, greenhouses and other facilities. Careful disposal of this type of waste is an integral component of the organization’s biorisk management. There is a wide variety of chemical, biological, and radioactive waste materials generated in typical e.g. microbiology, clinical and biotechnology laboratories. Infectious materials and sharps which are not properly managed pose serious health risks to each person who encounters them, whether in the laboratory itself or at some point during the process of removal and transport. Proper handling, packaging, and labeling are important to protect lab workers and assure that the waste will not become a community hazard en route to ultimate disposal. Some wastes associated with biological materials must be disposed of in special ways because they may have been contaminated with infectious organisms or genetically modified agents.

Major topics

  • recommend appropriate biological waste handling and disposal measures / routings in accordance with the current legislative requirements;
  • raise awareness of hazards that may be associated with inappropriate management of biological waste;
  • share the practical knowledge and technology of chemical and physical treatment of biological hazardous waste;
  • integrate the management of these issues into an existing biorisk program as part of a biorisk management system.

 

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to competence 7.2.14 and training specifications C.2.1.2.12 Biological waste management. 

The course also draws on the CWA 15793:2011 Laboratory biorisk management, specifically on section 4.4.4.5.3. on waste management and on section 4.4.4.5.2. on inactivation of biological agents and toxins.

1 day

25 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00

You may consider to combine this with courses:

F

Autoclaving as a safe and consistent process: Waste autoclaves - selection, validation and performance

Instructor:  Eric Dumermuth and Per Staugard

Short description of the course:

Biosafety concerns don't end with the end of the work, consideration of what you do with your dangerous waste is equally important.

This course focusses on autoclaving as the most reliable and most widely used method to render biological waste safe; at least the easiest accepted in the western world.

The course covers basic physics and chemistry: how and why is steam effective. Different designs of autoclaves are required by different processes and different loading programs. Advantages and disadvantages of different types of autoclaves  are discussed. Validation and process monitoring are discussed in the course.
Very briefly some alternative methods to render biological material safe, will be mentioned.
The course is intended for biosafety pro’s and engineers with basic knowledge of biosafety.

A few small group assignments are included in the program.

Main topics:

  • the choice where to install what type of autoclave
  • what is important in validation.
  • maintenance and validation are important as major issues when choosing an autoclave

 

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to some sections of competence 7.2.14 and training specifications C.2.1.2.12 Biological waste management.  

1/2 day

26 April 2017

9:00 – 12:30

You may consider to combine this with courses:

G

Safe and reliable Effluent Decontamination Systems : An EDS is more than “a Kill Tank”

Instructors: Per Staugaard

Short description of the course:

Biosafety concerns don't end with the end of the work, consideration of what you do with your liquid waste is equally important. The selection and treatment option will be based on risk assessment of the type and volume of the material. This course explores options, methods, validation to assist in this process.
This course will deal with different approaches and solutions based on different scenarios of bio agents, different primary processes, different scale of operation and will help in making decisions to yield a safe and reliable system.
The course is intended for biosafety pro’s and engineers with at least basic knowledge of biosafety and risk based approach.

The trainees will be asked to bring forward their own cases, either already built or in future operation. These case studies are used as a basis for group work.

Main topics:

  • design of an EDS is based on primary process[es].
  • the course projects a holistic view of the EDS in systematic approach.
  • maintenance and validation are important as major issues during the whole design process.

 

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to some sections of competence 7.2.14 and training specifications C.2.1.2.12 Biological waste management. 

1/2 day

26 April 2017

13:30 – 17:00

You may consider to combine this with courses:

H

Role of biosafety professional with respect to occupational health when working with experimental animals, including Zebra fish and other aquatic species

Instructors: Martin Kuster and Marc Fluttert

Short description of the course:

Working with animals may pose unique risks to animal handlers, lab-technicians or scientists. Improper risk control or issue management may lead to serious consequences in affected people as well as for the company or institution.

Participants of the course will discuss several case scenarios covering

  • Aquarium work
  • Work with monkeys
  • Use of lentiviral vectors
  • Use of highly active compounds
  • Update on lab-animal allergies
  • Review of control strategies and how to apply them


It is expected that participants share their knowledge in the field including issues and control strategies.

The goal of the course is to raise awareness for the cooperation necessary of the safety specialist and the occupational physicians. Also, the course serves as excellent opportunity for refreshing knowledge in the field including risk assessment and risk control measures. A specific focus will lay on discussing the hierarchy of controls and how it applies to an animal research facility.

Main topics to be covered:

  • Work in an Aquarium
  • Animal bites and allergens
  • Issues with handling lentiviral vectors
  • workers needing accommodation: pregnant women, immunocompromised people
  • Risk control in animal facilities: STOP principle


Target audience:

Biosafety professionals and occupational health professionals tasked with setting up or running occupational health programs in animal research facilities.

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to some sections of competence 7.2.4 and training specifications C.2.1.2.2 Occupational health and biosafety as well as specialized competence 7.3 laboratory experiments with small animals (e.g. rodents, fish) and specialist training specification C.2.2.1 Laboratory animal experiments – small animals. 

1 day

25 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00

I

Handling materials with unknown risks

Instructor: Amaya Leunda and Aline Baldo

Short description of the course:

There are several situations in R&D or in clinics where the manipulated biological material may present hazards of unknown or unsuspected nature. These activities require a careful assessment of their potential risk and a balanced application of risk management measures.

After a short introduction to legislation, guidelines, norms and other publications related to risks in handling biological materials, groups of participants will work around concrete situations for which they will be invited to conduct a risk assessment and discuss risk management measures. Examples of situations could be, but are not limited to, clinic and/or R&D activities with human and animal samples or cadavers, xenobiological material, human tumor cells or tissues, bacteria, viruses and viral vectors. Situations may also be proposed by participants.

Targeted Audience

This course is open to everyone exposed to or working with biological material, with particular interest for biosafety, occupational health, safety and environment professionals who would like to enlarge their practice on risk assessment and management of activities in R&D or clinical laboratories.

Learning Objectives

After this half-day course participants shall:

  • be able to identify activities where the handled biological material may present unknown or unsuspected hazards;
  • conduct risk assessment while taking into account the uncertainties around such situations;
  • propose risk management measures proportionate to the potential risks to protect human health and the environment
  • be able to consider related legislation, norms or scientific literature

 

Main Topics

  • Recognition of activities handling biological material with unknown hazards;
  • Identification of potential risks depending on the material and type of activity;
  • Application of proportionate risk management measures for the identified risks.
     

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

In accordance with CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence, this course fulfils in part core competences 7.2.3 Biological and other hazards in the work area and 7.2.4 Occupational health and biosafety

1/2 day

26 April 2017

9:00 – 12:30

J

Risks of working with neural tissues from conformational neurodegenerative disorders: The prion paradigms

Instructor: Miguel Calero

Short description of the course:

Most neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer´s, Parkinson and prion diseases, are associated with unusual forms of proteins that may pose novel and unique biological risks. This course explores the biological basis of prion protein conformational transmission, with the aim of providing the knowledge needed to control adequately the transmission of prions and potentially of other conformational neurodegenerative disorders.

 

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to some sections of competence 7.2.4 Occupational health and biosafety and competence 7.2.7 Biorisk assessment and management as well as training specifications C.2.1.2.2 Occupational health and biosafety and C.2.1.2.15 Biorisk management programme. 

1/2 day

26 April 2017

13:30 – 17:00

K

GMP tools and tips on "Large scale" manufacturing and GMP - what do the biosafety professionals need to know about GMP; tools and tips for the biosafety professional to teach the GMP people about biosafety

Instructors: Michel Cereghetti and Anneke Griffioen

Limited to 20 participants only - book early!

Short description of the course:

This one day course will give understanding of different aspects of GMP and Biosafety. An interactive workshop combining theory and practical examples covering GMP practices and biosafety operational procedures. Target audience includes:  laboratory managers, manufacturing managers, QA managers and biosafety officers in charge of GMP laboratories and production facilities dealing with contained microorganism.

Objectives:

The participant should be able to explain how a GMP facility is designed and operated, could identify areas of conflict with biosafety principles and could suggest solutions

Main Topics:

  • What do the biosafety professionals need to know about GMP;
  • Tools and tips for the biosafety professional to teach the GMP people about biosafety;
  • How to deal with contradictions between GMP and biosafety requirements
     

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to some sections of competence 7.2.6 and training specifications C.2.1.2.4 Containment principles and specialist training specification C.2.2.8 biosafety and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP): fundamental principles of GMP; GMP management systems; GMP facility requirements; conflict and solutions between GMP and biosafety.

1 day

25 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00

L

Tools and tips for practical Biosafety Training

Instructors: Jane Shallcross and  Suzanna Hawkey

Limited to 20 participants only - book early!

Short description of the course:

The course will describe the basic principles of training to allow the particpants to develop and carryout internal Biosafety training programmes tailored to different audiences and to evaluate the effectiveness of the training.

The target audience is for people who already have a good level of Biosafety knowledge but are now required to teach others.  The course will be limited to 20 participants to allow everyone to be involved with the design, presentation or evaluation of training.

The course will cover the following competencies set out in CWA 16335.
C.2.1.2.16 Training

  • Principles of adult education, learning methodologies and presentation skills
  • Select appropriate tools and learning situations (when and how to train)
  • Whom to train  - designing training suitable for people from different levels within an organisation (management, principle investigators, lab workers, animal facility workers, maintenance workers, cleaning personnel. Security personnel, contractors, visitors, students etc
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of training

 

Participants will design a short training session in groups of 4 which they will give to the rest of the course participants.  The groups will be allocated a topic and two audiences so they can compare how a training session will alter depending on the type of learner.   Participants can use training materials provided, or participants can bring along their own training materials. 

Topics for training:

Select one of the following:

  • Assign typical laboratory waste to the correct waste stream. To include autoclaving, containing waste, chemical decontamination, sharps boxes. (learners: Porter with poor english language skills, Laboratory worker)
  • Describe the planning required in order to minimize the impact of accidents and prevent future accidents. (learners:new starter, senior manager)
  • Demonstrate Good Microbiological Practice in terms of aseptic technique, accuracy and contamination control (learners:Laboratory worker, student)
  • Demonstrate how to enter and exit laboratories, select appropriate PPE, and wash hands safely(learners: Maintence worker, visitor)
  • Describe the features of your laboratory (learners:maintenace worker, security personnel)
     

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The topic refers to competence 7.2.20 and training specifications C.2.1.2.16 Training.

1 day

26 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00

M

Applied biosafety risk assessment in the daily work of a biosafety professional

Instructors: Stéphane Karlen and Kathrin Summermatter

Short description of the course:

The role of a biosafety professional (BSP) within an institution is challenging. Many times, the BSP has to find ad hoc solutions for issues raised during daily laboratory activities by applying the principle of ADORA – “all depends on risk assessment”.

This course is a combination of presentations and group exercises of practical examples from day to day work in a laboratory environment and animal facilities. Participants will learn the principles of applied biosafety risk assessments using their knowledge and their skills. Furthermore, participants will have the opportunity to bring along examples from their home institutions.

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence references

Competence 7.2.7 and training specifications C.2.1.2.5 Biorisk assessment and management

The biosafety professional shall be able to carry out a risk assessment for a given situation and decide on mitigation strategies. The biosafety professional shall be able to provide guidance on biological hazard identification, risk assessment and management to project leaders, principal investigators, management and other relevant personnel.

Competence 7.2.11 and training specification C.2.1.2.9 on Good microbiological techniques (GMT)

The biosafety professional shall be able to understand and apply good microbiological techniques in order to guide staff to enable them to create and maintain a safe working environment (workplace and workflow).

Competence 7.2.21 and training specification C.2.1.2. 17Communication skills and information / knowledge systems

The biosafety professional shall be able to transfer information clearly and convincingly to an audience including management, laboratory workers, ancillary personnel and external parties. The biosafety professional shall be able to communicate with personnel at all levels with the proper degree of understanding and sensitivity.

1 day

25 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00

N

Latest methodologies in gene technology
New risks? New uncertainties? New risk assessment?

Instructors:

Ursula Jenal, Jenal & Partners Biosafety Consulting, Switzerland
Nigel Silman, Public Health England & University of the West of England, UK

Short description of the course:

Techniques of genetic engineering have allowed significant reconstruction of organisms. New methodologies in gene technology might aim at even more extensive synthetic recombination of genetic material involving, inter alia, conventional or xeno DNA and RNA, chimeric viral vectors, and inserts from all sorts of different biological backgrounds resulting in more or less synthetic constructs. New techniques might also lead to combinations of biologically active genetic material with synthetic nanoparticles, notably in nanomedicine.

Assessment of potential risks related to the latest genetic engineering methodologies requires thorough evaluation of the characteristics of resulting constructs, i.e. chimeric or de-extinct viruses, and their potential effects on people and the environment. Risk assessment might lead to obvious findings, at first hand, but knowledge gaps might give some uncertainty to them, which should not be disregarded. For instance, by using gene drives (super-Mendelian inheritance), potential non-target effects might be much more prominent compared with conventional genetic engineering.

This course will cover latest methodologies in genetic engineering, such as gene drives, synthetic biology etc. and discuss relevant issues that need to be addressed in risk assessment of such activities, including both biosafety and biosecurity aspects as well as bioethics. Applicable risk assessment methodologies will be proposed.

With this course, participants will not only understand latest methodologies in genetic engineering but will also know how to be able to address potential risks of these methodologies and their outcome. Participants will be able to ask the right questions, to discern between known and unknown risks and take consequences from knowledge gaps such as application of increased safety measures.

The course mainly focuses on genetic engineering methodologies applied under contained use conditions, however, it also expands on issues that need to be addressed due to an accidental release of engineered organisms into the environment to their use as dedicated medicinal products or deliberate release as biocides.

The workshop is suitable for all interested and involved in thorough biological risk assessment, foremost BSOs facing new challenges regarding genetic engineering.

The workshop topics will be covered by both introductory presentations, intermittent discussions and case studies. Participants are asked to actively participate in the workshop by bringing their own risk assessment questions and work situation up for discussion.

Major topics:

  • genetic engineering methodologies,
  • risk assessment in genetic engineering,
     

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

The course draws on the CWA16335:2011, mainly on section 7.2.2. and Annex C.2.1.2 on general principles of molecular biology and genetic engineering, and on section 7.2.7 and Annex C.2.1.2.5 on biorisk assessment and management and on section 7.2.8 and Annex C.2.1.2.6 on environmental safety .

1 day

26 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00

O

Biosecurity

Instructors: Mirjam Schaap  and Heather Sheeley

Short description of the course:

"Keep bad bugs away from people - Keep bad people away from bugs", this quote is a simplification of the terms biosafety and biosecurity, but clearly describes what it is all about. More in detail, as defined in CWA16335, biosecurity (restricted to laboratory biosecurity) is about the protection, control and accountability for biological materials within laboratories, in order to prevent their loss, theft, misuse, diversion of, unauthorized access or intentional unauthorized release.

The course will start with an introduction in biosecurity covering the various biosecurity key areas (physical security, security of materials, knowledge and information security, screening of personnel and transport security), international networks and regulations. The BSO needs to be able to be active in raising biosecurity awareness to assist in compliance and vigilance. Through tools, short films and scenarios participants will obtain insight in biosecurity vulnerabilities within their organisation and will have more insight in how to raise biosecurity awareness.

Through a combination of presentations by the course instructors, open plenary discussions and group exercises based on scenarios, by the end of the course participants will:

  • be able to recognize biosecurity vulnerabilities
  • be aware of the possibilities to raise biosecurity awareness within his/her organisation
     

Main topics:

  • Introduction in biosecurity and its various key areas
  • International networks and regulations
  • Methods and tools to raise biosecurity awareness
     

CWA 16335:2011 Biosafety professional competence reference

7.2.5 Human factors
The biosafety professional shall be able to understand human factors (e.g. behaviour, reliability, ergonomics) leading to intentional and unintentional errors. The biosafety professional shall have the skills to influence behaviours and risk perception, and be persuasive in promoting good biosafety and biosecurity practices taking into account cultural and socio-economic considerations.

7.2.19 Physical security
The biosafety professional shall be able to understand and communicate the importance of implementing and maintaining the physical security measures determined as part of the risk assessment process.

The topic refers also to parts of training specification C.2.1.2.5 Biorisk assessment and management and C.2.1.3.1 International regulatory framework, standards, guidelines and conventions

1 day

25 April 2017

9:00 – 17:00